POSTS CATEGORIZED:
“Europe, India, Africa”

Apr.07
2014

Starring iCook

In Ukraine, expectant mothers often tune into the popular TV program 9 Months for all kinds of advice about pregnancy and new parenthood.

Recently 9 Months fans learned about cooking fast and healthy family meals from a chef at Ukraine’s Amway Academy, which provides online and instructor-led learning opportunities for Amway Business Owners and customers as well as ABO certification programs.

Chef Andrew Kubrak appeared on four segments, showing viewers how to prepare easy, healthy and tasty dishes using iCook stainless and nonstick cookware. He demonstrated how the special iCook VITALOK low-moisture cooking method preserves nutrients and makes meals appetizing.

New segments of 9 Months air weekly on Ukraine’s TBi channel (in English: TVI). TBi is carried by 85 percent of Ukraine’s cable networks and is viewed in about 60 percent of Ukrainian cities with populations over 50,000.

Last year, the Amway Academy provided more than 200,000 ABO and customer training contacts—including some tasty lessons from Chef Kubrak.

Click here to view a 45-minute iCook segment. It’s in Ukrainian, but isn’t the language of food universal?

Mar.26
2014

Kazakhstan kickoff

Here are some fun facts about Kazakhstan: It’s the world’s largest landlocked country by land area. Its territory of 2,727,300 square kilometres (1,053,000 sq. mi.) is larger than Western Europe. And it’s the newest place where people can buy Amway products.

Last week, Kazakhstan became Amway’s newest market, joining the more than 100 countries and territories where we already operate.

Amway Kazakhstan is the company’s first official presence in Central Asia and is headquartered in Almaty, the country’s largest city.

Amway Kazakhstan offers the same brands and products as Amway Russia, its neighbor to the north.

We are excited to offer the Amway Business Opportunity to our new friends in Kazakhstan, as they carry out our mission of helping people live better lives.

— Written by Austin Langlois

Mar.24
2014

Fuzz buster

The amazing scientists in the Amway laundry care lab love inspiration, and when they hear from Amway Business Owners about a particular laundry challenge, they get inspired.

Take, for example, the challenge of keeping black and dark-colored cotton clothing looking vibrant and new, wear after wear. Machine-washing cottons causes fuzzing, pilling and dye transfer that can make these items look faded and old long before their time.

The R&D team began looking for ways to help consumers extend the appearance of their newer dark cotton items in one economical and easy-to-use laundry solution.

The team developed a detergent technology that preserves the appearance of dark cottons, and even improves the appearance of many dark cotton items that look faded from previous washings in other detergents.

The technology is used in SA8 Black Concentrated Liquid Laundry Detergent with Bioquest formula exclusively from the Amway Home brand. It is now available in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, and is expected to be available in Japan and Europe later this year.

When our laundry products help consumers wear their clothing longer, families save money–and it helps slow the flow of these items into the waste stream. That’s a double win! Read more about the product at Amway Startup.

Mar.07
2014

The concern, the cure

Melissophobia is the fear of bees; blennophobia is the fear of slime; and chorophobia is the fear of dancing. In fact, from A to Z, clinical names for numerous fears exist.

In the 2010-2012 editions of Amway’s Entrepreneurship Report, the “fear of failure” was consistently among the highest obstacles to becoming self-employed. We believe this fear leads to a high gap between people who can imagine starting their own business and those who actually do.

So in our 2013 report, we took a closer look. We wanted to know: Did the fear exist because people did not believe in their abilities, their networks and ideas? Or because they did not feel supported by their environment?

Among the polled countries worldwide, 41 percent of respondents feared “financial burdens up to bankruptcy.” For 31 percent, “the economic crisis” turned out to be a considerable obstacle (even truer in the European Union). Non-financial fears included disappointing one’s family, loss of reputation, and and not being unable to handle the high level of responsibility.

The percentage of respondents who are fearful of starting an enterprise is represented below for six of the 24 countries studied.

These fears may not have clinical names, but at Amway we seek to “treat” them with a business model that is low-risk, low-cost and has built-in mentorship and support. And fear not, if it doesn’t meet a person’s expectations, it has a money-back guarantee.

Feb.04
2014

More than a number

When Amway releases its annual sales, people focus on the big number,  sales of USD$11.8 billion for 2013, another record for the company.

But we measure our accomplishments in smaller terms – the individual successes of a lot of ones, twos and threes.

Ones, such as Patrice Deibert of the U.S., who has built a thriving Amway business in Japan.

Twos, including Vladimir and Elena Sidorov of Russia, who found an outlet for their entrepreneurial spirit in Amway.

And threes, like Minnie Wen, Li Man Bong and Roy Li of Hong Kong, each of whom started a promising career but wanted more control over their future.

Millions of people like Patrice, Vladimir and Roy are achieving their potential through their Amway businesses.

That’s why our annual sales are more than a number.  They represent the collective achievements of our business owners all over the world, supported by our more than 21,000 employees.

To them, we say thank you, and congratulations on another amazing year.

Jan.24
2014

Great entrepreneurial will

This definition of “will” is one we can really appreciate: “The power of control the mind has over its own actions; the power of choosing one’s actions and asserting one’s choice.”

In Greece – the world’s 72nd most populous country according to 2012 figures – the findings of the Amway Global Entrepreneurship Report revealed that will and determination are as strong as ever, despite the economic recovery being experienced there. We learned:

  • More than two thirds (69%) of respondents in Greece have a positive attitude toward self-employment, with extremely positive attitudes coming from respondents under the age of 30 (79%) and students (86%).
  • More than half (53%) of respondents can imagine starting their own business – a tiny change from 2012 and proof positive that Greece has great entrepreneurial will.
  • To 44% of respondents from Greece, “making a return to the job market” is an extremely appealing motivator for starting a business, likely due to rising unemployment there.

That said, what concerns us greatly is that 85% of respondents in Greece, and 90% of females, see the fear of failing with an enterprise as an obstacle to starting a business. This is 15% more than the worldwide average.

Where Greece makes a statistical and impressive rebound is that it believes its society to be significantly more entrepreneurship-friendly than other countries categorized as crisis-struck, such as Hungary, Romania, Portugal and Spain.

The way they feel could likely be summed up in this man-on-the-street interview: “We are strongly connected to our place . . .  and we still think we are the best in the world.”

With a will like that, we look forward to the results from next year’s Amway Global Entrepreneurship Report.

Jan.10
2014

Entrepreneurship in Great Britain

Entrepreneurship is well-liked in Great Britain, especially among the young and educated.

That’s according to the 2013 Amway Global Entrepreneurship Report, which studied views and attitudes toward entrepreneurship and self-employment in 24 countries.

Here are some results from Great Britain:

  • On average, almost 8 out of 10 respondents, or 77%, have a positive attitude toward self-employment. That’s a boost from last year’s 75% and about 7% higher than the international average.
  • Among 18- to 24-year-olds the number grows to 86%. Add a university degree to that group and the number jumps to 91%.
  • On the whole, 88% of the respondents with a college degree report positive feelings toward entrepreneurship. Views dropped among those without a degree to 74%, but that’s still higher than the international average in that group — 67%

So, why do those in Great Britain like the idea of starting a business? Well, it’s not about the money. “Second income prospects” was one of the least important reasons they would consider it. The highest ranked reason was “independence from an employer and being one’s own boss.” The second most appealing reason was “self-fulfillment and possibility to realize own ideas.”

Question asked: In your opinion, which of the following aspects appeal to you as reasons to start up your own business?

Jan.03
2014

Understanding Entrepreneurship in Ukraine

Self-employment is gaining attractiveness in Ukraine, according to the 2013 Amway Global Entrepreneurship Report. In fact, among Ukrainians under 30 years old, and those living in the West and South regions, positive attitudes toward entrepreneurship are some of the highest in our entire study — at 83%.

Recent advances in infrastructure, agriculture and the business start-up environment in Ukraine are likely contributing to the positive outlook.

Additional learnings:

  • Money talks: When compared to the international average, respondents from Ukraine overwhelmingly state that the most appealing reason to start a business is the prospect of a second income.
  • Location matters: Respondents living in Kiev see it differently, choosing “self-fulfillment” as a motivator to starting a business at a higher rate than their fellow countrymen.
  • Gender does not: In Ukraine, there is no gender gap in positivity toward entrepreneurship.
  • Any age: In contrast to most other countries surveyed, respondents over the age of 30 are just as leary as self employment as a good choice for themselves as their younger countrymen. Maturity and experience do not lessen the fear of failure.
  • Business friendly: Ukrainian respondents see “low bureaucracy” as an important factor to the foundation of business. They see their regulatory, media and social environment — despite recent forward momentum — as neither friendly nor unfriendly. (See below.)

Amway looks forward to its second decade of doing business in Ukraine as well as continuing to study, sharpen and socialize ideas for keeping the entrepreneurial spirit alive and well there.

Question asked: If you think about politics, media coverage and the people you know: how entrepreneurship-friendly is the society in Ukraine?

Dec.20
2013

Reporting on Russia

In just three months, Moscow will play host to the 2014 Global Entrepreneurship Congress, an event with goals that are very much aligned to that of our recently released Amway Global Entrepreneurship Report (AGER), including:

• To exchange ideas favorable to entrepreneurship.

• To show entrepreneurs how collaborative communities can help them launch and scale.

• To increase global recognition of entrepreneurs for the important role they play in society.

In fact, Russia was one of 24 countries we studied, and our findings could be useful in shaping the nation’s policy, education and image-building for entrepreneurship. For example, we learned that positive attitudes toward self-employment in Russia are declining, down from 73% positive in 2012 to 65% in 2013. And that the Ural and Northwest regions were nearly 20 points lower in positivity than in Siberia and the South.

Alarmingly few females in Russia said they could imagine starting their own business (26%), which is surprising given the independence and mobility of Russian women.

This warrants discussion during the Global Entrepreneurship Congress and beyond about how to strengthen and nurture women’s entrepreneurial spirit and meet the particular needs of would-be female entrepreneurs.

We’re committed to these conversations, to the actions that can come as a result, and most of all, to our amazing Amway Russia Business Owners – people such as Mark and Marina Kaplun and Vladimir and Elena Sidorov. They stay the course, encourage others to define themselves through entrepreneurship and, along with other direct sellers in Russia, help build better economies and communities.

Dec.11
2013

Quality assured

Pull any cleaning product off your shelf at home. Do you know how much that product is quality-tested before it gets to you?

We can tell you, if it’s one of our Amway home care brands.

Amway Quality Assurance lab analysts perform hundreds of tests a day on our surface, dish and laundry care products made in our U.S.-based manufacturing plants to ensure they meet our exacting quality standards.

That amounts to 124,000 tests every year on raw ingredients, finished products and even packaging — just for home products made in Ada, Michigan. Our home care products made in Belgium, China, India and Vietnam are tested with the same rigor. All to ensure our products always look, smell and perform exactly as promised by the scientists who created the formulas — and that they are safe for your family.

We don’t have to be that exacting. No regulatory agency in the world requires that much testing.

We do it for one reason: to ensure the more than 3 million people worldwide who proudly use and sell Amway products are getting the quality they deserve — in every package.