POSTS TAGGED WITH:
“Business Opportunity”

Mar.19
2014

Constant celebration

The U.S. Small Business Administration has declared that March is national Start a Business Month.

At Amway, every month is start a business month, whether in the U.S. or around the world! In fact, every day, we equip new entrepreneurs with the mentorship, confidence, products and training they need to own and run a business.

In the video below,  Amway Chairman Steve Van Andel said, “We’ve never lost sight of our belief in entrepreneurs.  They have been the essential . . . driving force of our business for over 50 years.”

“Entrepreneurs fuel our success, as well as the economies of communities around the world,” added Amway President Doug DeVos. “Today, the spirit of entrepreneurism is alive and well.”

The findings of the 2013 Amway Global Entrepreneurship Report – which measured the dynamics of entrepreneurism among 26,000 people in 24 countries – reinforces these statements.

In 2014, Amway will continue to study the entrepreneurial landscape, looking at what helps and holds people back from bringing their entrepreneurial ideas to life.

We’ll also be adding 13 new countries to our study this year, including India, Korea, China, Brazil, South Africa and Norway. A total of 37 countries will be surveyed, and the release of our results will coincide with Global Entrepreneurship Week in November of this year. (Check out this great video of coverage from last year’s release of the report.)

Until then, follow us on Twitter or Facebook to join the conversation about the role that Amway, and the entire direct selling industry, plays in building and fostering the entrepreneurial spirit around the world. Search for #AGER to find posts specifically about the Amway Global Entrepreneurship Report.


YouTube Direkt

Mar.07
2014

The concern, the cure

Melissophobia is the fear of bees; blennophobia is the fear of slime; and chorophobia is the fear of dancing. In fact, from A to Z, clinical names for numerous fears exist.

In the 2010-2012 editions of Amway’s Entrepreneurship Report, the “fear of failure” was consistently among the highest obstacles to becoming self-employed. We believe this fear leads to a high gap between people who can imagine starting their own business and those who actually do.

So in our 2013 report, we took a closer look. We wanted to know: Did the fear exist because people did not believe in their abilities, their networks and ideas? Or because they did not feel supported by their environment?

Among the polled countries worldwide, 41 percent of respondents feared “financial burdens up to bankruptcy.” For 31 percent, “the economic crisis” turned out to be a considerable obstacle (even truer in the European Union). Non-financial fears included disappointing one’s family, loss of reputation, and and not being unable to handle the high level of responsibility.

The percentage of respondents who are fearful of starting an enterprise is represented below for six of the 24 countries studied.

These fears may not have clinical names, but at Amway we seek to “treat” them with a business model that is low-risk, low-cost and has built-in mentorship and support. And fear not, if it doesn’t meet a person’s expectations, it has a money-back guarantee.

Mar.03
2014

Believe!

Nearly 40 years ago, Rich DeVos had a message for the world – “Believe!”

In his first book, a 173-page narrative co-authored with Charles Paul Conn, the Amway co-founder sought to empower a world of individuals to meet their unlimited potential.

“I believe that one of the most powerful forces in the world is the will of people who believe in themselves, who dare to aim high, to go confidently after the things they want from life,” DeVos said in the book’s first chapter.

That message of potential and the desire to empower individuals remains the driving force of Amway today.

“I always heard Dad tell people: You can do it. You have potential. You can achieve whatever you set your mind to doing,” Amway President Doug DeVos recently told an audience near Amway World Headquarters.  “It’s all about the potential of the people.”

Perhaps the Amway co-founder summed it up best on page 22 of “Believe!”

“’I can.’  It is a powerful sentence,” he wrote.  “It works.  People can do what they believe they can do.”

DeVos is still writing. On April 1 his fifth book, titled “Simply Rich,” will be released.  It’s a memoir of the major events of his remarkable life.  It will be available at major booksellers, and can be preordered through Amazon, BN.com and Simon and Schuster.

Feb.12
2014

Shaping the future

One of Dr. Anuradha Nagarajan’s former M.B.A. students made international news in 2011 when she invented an improved, low-cost and life-changing way for women in rural India to carry water over rough terrain.

This past Saturday, Dr. Nagarajan – along with Amway Chief Sales Officer John Parker and eVent.com Cofounder Andi Sie – issued a similar challenge to another 40 University of Michigan business students.

The task: Use principles of entrepreneurship to create more sustainable economies and bring more of the world’s growing population into the middle class.

Nagarajan, Parker and Sie participated on the Entrepreneurship Panel of the 24th Annual Asia Business Conference in Ann Arbor, themed “Discover the Possibilities: Shape the Future,” and students from Japan, Korea, China, Thailand, USA, India, Indonesia and Malaysia attended.

Parker touched on how Amway measures success by the number of people we can help start their own small, independent businesses, bringing more economic and personal flexibility and independence to their lives.

Sie covered his experience in the real estate, health care and technology sectors as an entrepreneur who abides by one rule: Have a purpose. Purpose, said Sie, is the key to success that helps entrepreneurs get through the inevitable hard times.

Students were asked by the panelists to consider:

  • The advantages of remaining privately held, like Amway, so that taking the “long view” on solving local or global challenges is possible, over short-term gains for investors.
  • Remaining authentic to who you are, and your purpose, in all communications.
  • Understanding cultural drivers such as loyalty in Japan and youth empowerment in Vietnam.
  • A tenet that Amway founders lived by: Act as a guest in every country where you do business; act as if you want to be invited back tomorrow; and the next day, and the next. Never forget that it is a privilege to be doing business in countries outside of your own.
  • Be adaptable, but not indecisive.
  • The “official” first answer of almost anyone, be it a potential partner, a potential new customer, or an investor, will always be “no.” Don’t take “no” for an answer.
  • Read the book, “Delivering Happiness.” It inspired Sie and helped him realize to not only seek opportunity, but to give opportunity to others.

It was a unique chance for students to get real world inspiration to shape the future—their own and the world’s.

Feb.10
2014

Early intervention

At Amway, we have an award-winning internship program that immerses students in the business world, giving them real projects and opportunities to learn from seasoned colleagues and executives.

Our Amway Business Owners also have access to free, extensive training to help ensure a successful start.

So, what about our new employees? They are not left out. The Early in Career Group at our World Headquarters was started in 2010 for anyone new to the Amway company. Regular meetings and social functions help them network, meet new people and expand their knowledge outside their own department.

They focus on professional development, leadership opportunities or volunteering events.

While it’s focused on helping new employees “connect, collaborate and grow,” veterans are welcome, too. In fact, they often use the group as a resource to tap fresh points of view.

Company executives, like Amway Chief Sales Officer John Parker, say fostering the group is “critical to the future of the company.”

“One of the great things about EiCG is that it keeps Amway entrepreneurial,” Parker said. “We’re a big company, a big business, lots of employees, and any big company like that ends up with silos.

“It’s those individuals that are part of the EiCG network that are the future leaders and the future of the business.”

Check out what some of the group members have to say in this video.


YouTube Direkt

Jan.10
2014

Entrepreneurship in Great Britain

Entrepreneurship is well-liked in Great Britain, especially among the young and educated.

That’s according to the 2013 Amway Global Entrepreneurship Report, which studied views and attitudes toward entrepreneurship and self-employment in 24 countries.

Here are some results from Great Britain:

  • On average, almost 8 out of 10 respondents, or 77%, have a positive attitude toward self-employment. That’s a boost from last year’s 75% and about 7% higher than the international average.
  • Among 18- to 24-year-olds the number grows to 86%. Add a university degree to that group and the number jumps to 91%.
  • On the whole, 88% of the respondents with a college degree report positive feelings toward entrepreneurship. Views dropped among those without a degree to 74%, but that’s still higher than the international average in that group — 67%

So, why do those in Great Britain like the idea of starting a business? Well, it’s not about the money. “Second income prospects” was one of the least important reasons they would consider it. The highest ranked reason was “independence from an employer and being one’s own boss.” The second most appealing reason was “self-fulfillment and possibility to realize own ideas.”

Question asked: In your opinion, which of the following aspects appeal to you as reasons to start up your own business?

Jan.03
2014

Understanding Entrepreneurship in Ukraine

Self-employment is gaining attractiveness in Ukraine, according to the 2013 Amway Global Entrepreneurship Report. In fact, among Ukrainians under 30 years old, and those living in the West and South regions, positive attitudes toward entrepreneurship are some of the highest in our entire study — at 83%.

Recent advances in infrastructure, agriculture and the business start-up environment in Ukraine are likely contributing to the positive outlook.

Additional learnings:

  • Money talks: When compared to the international average, respondents from Ukraine overwhelmingly state that the most appealing reason to start a business is the prospect of a second income.
  • Location matters: Respondents living in Kiev see it differently, choosing “self-fulfillment” as a motivator to starting a business at a higher rate than their fellow countrymen.
  • Gender does not: In Ukraine, there is no gender gap in positivity toward entrepreneurship.
  • Any age: In contrast to most other countries surveyed, respondents over the age of 30 are just as leary as self employment as a good choice for themselves as their younger countrymen. Maturity and experience do not lessen the fear of failure.
  • Business friendly: Ukrainian respondents see “low bureaucracy” as an important factor to the foundation of business. They see their regulatory, media and social environment — despite recent forward momentum — as neither friendly nor unfriendly. (See below.)

Amway looks forward to its second decade of doing business in Ukraine as well as continuing to study, sharpen and socialize ideas for keeping the entrepreneurial spirit alive and well there.

Question asked: If you think about politics, media coverage and the people you know: how entrepreneurship-friendly is the society in Ukraine?

Nov.27
2013

Four corners

Earlier this month, all four Amway regional presidents sat down to chat with employees at Amway World Headquarters about their corners of the world. They shared insights, initiatives and compelling stories about local corporate citizenship efforts and Amway Business Owners (ABOs).

In Southeast Asia, Jim Payne uses his 30+ years of experience with Amway and time-tested relationships to lead several countries in which Amway already holds a top market share position. He highlighted Amway’s appeal to those under age 35 in Vietnam, one of our newest markets. He told a story of a Japanese ABO who lost half of her family and downline distributors during the 2011 tsunami. The loss motivated her to rebuild her business to the Diamond level in only three years, using her income to support and help rebuild her still-struggling community.

Greater China Regional President Gan Chee Eng, focused on China’s Amway Charity Foundation, which was recently named one of the Top 10 Most Transparent Foundations in China. The foundation was featured during this year’s Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) annual meeting, where its Spring Sprouts Kitchen project was highlighted as one of CGI’s Commitments to Action.

With 30 countries, 26 languages, 19 currencies and 11 time zones, Europe/India/Africa Regional President Samir Behl describes his region as having three advantages: diversity, complexity and opportunity. He shared that there are more women than men in Russia and they live longer. In addition to the societal impact of this, he (only half-jokingly) said this could contribute to a huge demand for beauty products such as ARTISTRY YOUTH XTEND.

Last, but certainly not least, in the home region of our headquarters – the Americas – Tanios Viviani says he lives for hearing, and telling, our ABO stories. The Americas president recently attended an event in the United States where he met a Costa Rican native who had left his parents and moved to Mexico to find success, promising not to return until they could be proud of him. After many years and he returned as a Diamond level ABO and was able to tell his mother that “Amway was [his] graduation in life.” That ABO now supports his family with his business. Tanios knows there are others like him capable and willing to do the same and says his region will do more than its part to ensure the Amway opportunity is relevant to future generations.

Across the miles and the 100-plus countries and territories where the Amway opportunity can be found, these four men brought their markets to life and connected our employees in Ada, Michigan, with the ABOs they support all over the world. 

Nov.14
2013

Earned recognition

Sri Soekarmoen McCarthy, a member of our global public relations team, recently spent some time with our friends at Amway Thailand. This week she shares her stories with us at The Amway Insider

On November 10, I attended a gala dinner as formal as the Oscars!

Men in suits and women adorned with formal evening dresses filled a large room in one of Bangkok’s largest convention centers. More than 1,500 people attended the event organized by the Thai Direct Selling Association to honor top distributors from 30 local and foreign direct selling companies in the country, including Avon, Giffarine and Amway.

Amway Business Owners Pongsak and Porntip Ajjimarangsee, Samran Unyuang and Niramol Werojnakul, and Worapop and Titiporn Thawong were among those who received recognition.

Amway selected the winners based on more than just the bottom line. They were also selected based on their compliance to the Rules and Code of Ethics set but the company and the World Federation of Direct Selling Associations.

Kittawat Ritteerawee, general manager of Amway Thailand and president of the TDSA, presented the awards along with other executives from each direct selling company. Government officials from the agency that oversees the direct selling industry and members of the media were also invited.

I was privileged to sit at the same table with the Amway Business Owners who won the award. Prior to joining Amway they were educators, engineers or health care professionals.

Worapop grew up with parents who were Amway Business Owners, while his wife, Thawong, worked as medical doctor in a clinic. The Ajjimarangsees both have doctorate degrees from prestigious universities.  And Unyuang was on the staff at a local health clinic while his wife, Werojnakul, was a nurse before they joined Amway.

Regardless of their background, they all found success with Amway. Congratulations to our ABOs!

Oct.28
2013

Global potential

Since being named chairman of the United States Chamber of Commerce in June, Amway Chairman Steve Van Andel has shared lunch with the new president of South Korea and addressed the leaders of the top 100 U.S. chambers.

On a recent trip to China, he met with Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang, several other government officials, top media and distributor leaders.

The theme has been similar in all of these meetings: Our potential is great if we remain true to our values, show leadership and embrace innovation.

“Dad and Rich believed people have an innate desire to make their lives better,” Van Andel said. “And they believed that by empowering others, people would work to reach their greatest potential. At Amway, we offer people the opportunity to own their own business … to pursue a level of success they desire.

“And with commitment and hard work, they can change their lives. Improving people’s lives has been our vision since the beginning. And we believe that ultimately, it’s why Amway’s been so successful.”

It’s a message Van Andel will continue share all over the world as he travels this next year as chairman of both Amway and the U.S. Chamber. We think it has potential – do you agree?

Written by Andrea Clark